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Zoom The recent tragedy at a private farm in Ohio where 48 exotic animals were shot dead has sparked interest and anger around the world. After reading numerous comments and debates, I am prompted to share some information about Bengal Tigers - 18 of which were lost during that fateful day.

Although the Bengal tiger is the most numerous of all tiger subspecies, the total wild population number is estimated to be less than 2500. That is less than the total number of tiger pets in the USA alone.
They are being pushed out of their natural habitat by a growing and spreading human population. Increasing human-tiger conflicts often lead to retributive killings. Tigers additionally face a serious threat from the Chinese medicine industry - the main reason for the unrelenting poaching pressure. For example, in 2009 the Panna Tiger Reserve in India lost all of its tigers (24 in total) due to excessive poaching.
But what makes them so important? Firstly, they are apex predators (top predators) in their environment. They maintain the balance by keeping herbivore numbers regular. The crucial importance of predators in an ecosystem has been documented many times. A famous example are the wolves in Yellowstone National Park. 

Secondly, they are amazingly beautiful creatures. Economically speaking, they are great money makers when it comes to tourism. Although there are no official statistics, apparently around 500, 000 tourists visit tiger reserves every year in India alone. These dollars support local communities so a loss of tigers can mean a loss of local income. 

What I want is for people to understand what an incredible loss 18 Bengal Tigers is to the planet. The officers who shot the exotic animals, including the tigers, at the private farm were simply doing their job and I do not deny that they were working in some very terrifying and extreme circumstances.
In light of the situation, perhaps the animals deaths will not be in vain. Slack exotic animal ownership laws in the USA have been tolerated for far too long and perhaps this dark cloud will have silver lining. These laws need to change. Wild animals belong in the wild - not only are they needed there for the role they play in their ecosystem, they are a source of income to many local reserves AND they add to an increasingly dwindling gene pool. 
Your next step: Sign the petition to ban the sale, ownership and harboring of exotic animals in Ohio.

The recent tragedy at a private farm in Ohio where 48 exotic animals were shot dead has sparked interest and anger around the world. After reading numerous comments and debates, I am prompted to share some information about Bengal Tigers - 18 of which were lost during that fateful day.

Although the Bengal tiger is the most numerous of all tiger subspecies, the total wild population number is estimated to be less than 2500. That is less than the total number of tiger pets in the USA alone.

They are being pushed out of their natural habitat by a growing and spreading human population. Increasing human-tiger conflicts often lead to retributive killings. Tigers additionally face a serious threat from the Chinese medicine industry - the main reason for the unrelenting poaching pressure. For example, in 2009 the Panna Tiger Reserve in India lost all of its tigers (24 in total) due to excessive poaching.

But what makes them so important? Firstly, they are apex predators (top predators) in their environment. They maintain the balance by keeping herbivore numbers regular. The crucial importance of predators in an ecosystem has been documented many times. A famous example are the wolves in Yellowstone National Park

Secondly, they are amazingly beautiful creatures. Economically speaking, they are great money makers when it comes to tourism. Although there are no official statistics, apparently around 500, 000 tourists visit tiger reserves every year in India alone. These dollars support local communities so a loss of tigers can mean a loss of local income. 

What I want is for people to understand what an incredible loss 18 Bengal Tigers is to the planet. The officers who shot the exotic animals, including the tigers, at the private farm were simply doing their job and I do not deny that they were working in some very terrifying and extreme circumstances.

In light of the situation, perhaps the animals deaths will not be in vain. Slack exotic animal ownership laws in the USA have been tolerated for far too long and perhaps this dark cloud will have silver lining. These laws need to change. Wild animals belong in the wild - not only are they needed there for the role they play in their ecosystem, they are a source of income to many local reserves AND they add to an increasingly dwindling gene pool. 

Your next step: Sign the petition to ban the sale, ownership and harboring of exotic animals in Ohio.

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  1. sexyactionplanet posted this