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Posts tagged endangered.
Zoom “Conservation Sew Mates” - Proceeds go to support whale shark research projects in the Philippines! If you want one, please order on Flowing River’s FB page.

“Conservation Sew Mates” - Proceeds go to support whale shark research projects in the Philippines! If you want one, please order on Flowing River’s FB page.

06.02.13 4
Zoom
04.19.13 7
Zoom Dr Kathy Townsend from Turtles in Trouble with the debris extracted from a coastal sub-adult flat back turtle in Moreton Bay, Australia. Much of this was plastic bag remnants.

Dr Kathy Townsend from Turtles in Trouble with the debris extracted from a coastal sub-adult flat back turtle in Moreton Bay, Australia. Much of this was plastic bag remnants.

03.06.13 140
Zoom
03.05.13 18
Zoom Lecture: Is the Great Barrier Reef on Death Row?
David Attenborough introduces Charlie Veron from the Australian Institute of Marine Science on the future of the Great Barrier Reef at the Royal Society.

Lecture: Is the Great Barrier Reef on Death Row?

David Attenborough introduces Charlie Veron from the Australian Institute of Marine Science on the future of the Great Barrier Reef at the Royal Society.

12.06.12 2
Zoom A golden Brushtail Possum joey was rescued a few months ago and buddied up with a grey Brushtail joey already in care after his mother had been killed by a car. Their wildlife carer Lynda says “possum joeys tend to do better in care when they have a buddy of the same species to put them at ease. Both joeys having lost their mums are seeking reassurance in each other and it’s working a treat.”

A golden Brushtail Possum joey was rescued a few months ago and buddied up with a grey Brushtail joey already in care after his mother had been killed by a car. Their wildlife carer Lynda says “possum joeys tend to do better in care when they have a buddy of the same species to put them at ease. Both joeys having lost their mums are seeking reassurance in each other and it’s working a treat.”

11.29.12 4

"Finning bans made simple"

- Anyone anywhere interested in shark conservation and shark finning issues should watch this. Short, succinct video in simple English.

11.22.12 11
Zoom Can you spot the lizards being illegally smuggled through Perth customs?
The illegal trade of birds into and out of Australia is going virtually unchecked… with two sweeping government investigations failing to prosecute the smugglers they identified.
The investigations revealed the role of sophisticated networks of criminals trading eggs of native parrots with those of exotic parrots from South Africa, Singapore and the Philippines.
But despite having some of the toughest penalties in the world for wildlife crime, up to 10 years in jail and $100,000 fines, the alleged perpetrators were not even charged.
The previous national manager of investigations with the Australian Customs Service says that is because wildlife investigations are poorly resourced…

Can you spot the lizards being illegally smuggled through Perth customs?

The illegal trade of birds into and out of Australia is going virtually unchecked… with two sweeping government investigations failing to prosecute the smugglers they identified.

The investigations revealed the role of sophisticated networks of criminals trading eggs of native parrots with those of exotic parrots from South Africa, Singapore and the Philippines.

But despite having some of the toughest penalties in the world for wildlife crime, up to 10 years in jail and $100,000 fines, the alleged perpetrators were not even charged.

The previous national manager of investigations with the Australian Customs Service says that is because wildlife investigations are poorly resourced…

11.17.12 1
Zoom limshady:

creepicrawlies:

via zooborns.com

*-*

limshady:

creepicrawlies:

via zooborns.com

*-*

11.09.12 527

One word. Beautiful.

11.02.12 264506
Zoom
11.02.12 264
Zoom WORTH THE READ:
"…The human race makes big decisions based on an economic model that ignores many negative externalities.
A 'negative externality' is, very roughly, a way in which my actions impose a cost on you, for which I don’t pay any price.
For example: suppose I live in a high-rise apartment and my toilet breaks. Instead of fixing it, I realize that I can just use a bucket — and throw its contents out the window! Whee! If society has no mechanism for dealing with people like me, I pay no price for doing this. But you, down there, will be very unhappy.
This isn’t just theoretical. Once upon a time in Europe there were few private toilets, and people would shout “gardyloo!” before throwing their waste down to the streets below. In retrospect that seems disgusting, but many of the big problems that afflict us now can be seen as the result of equally disgusting externalities. For example:

Carbon dioxide pollution caused by burning fossil fuels. If the expected costs of global warming and ocean acidification were included in the price of fossil fuels, other sources of energy would more quickly become competitive. This is the idea behind a carbon tax or a ‘cap-and-trade program’ where companies pay for permits to put carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.


Dead zones. Put too much nitrogen and phosophorus in the river, and lots of algae will grow in the ocean near the river’s mouth. When the algae dies and rots, the water runs out of dissolved oxygen, and fish cannot live there. Then we have a ‘dead zone’. Dead zones are expanding and increasing in number. For example, there’s one about 20,000 square kilometers in size near the mouth of the Mississippi River. Hog farming, chicken farming and runoff from fertilized crop lands are largely to blame.


Overfishing. Since there is no ownership of fish, everyone tries to catch as many fish as possible, even though this is depleting fish stocks to the point of near-extinction. There’s evidence that populations of all big predatory ocean fish have dropped 90% since 1950. Populations of cod, bluefish tuna and many other popular fish have plummeted, despite feeble attempts at regulation.


Species extinction due to habitat loss. Since the economic value of intact ecosystems has not been fully reckoned, in many parts of the world there’s little price to pay for destroying them.


Overpopulation. Rising population is a major cause of the stresses on our biosphere, yet it costs less to have your own child than to adopt one. (However, a pilot project in India is offering cash payments to couples who put off having children for two years after marriage.)
One could go on.
Externalities often arise when we treat some resource as essentially infinite — for example fish, or clean water, or clean air. We thus impose no cost for using it. This is fine at first. But because this resource is free, we use more and more — until it no longer makes sense to act as if we have an infinite amount. As a physicist would say, the approximation breaks down, and we enter a new regime.
This is happening all over the place now. We have reached the point where we need to treat most resources as finite and take this into account in our economic decisions. We can’t afford so many externalities. It is irrational to let them go on.
But what can you do about this? Or what can I do?
We can do the things anyone can do. Educate ourselves. Educate our friends. Vote. Conserve energy. Don’t throw buckets of crap out of apartment windows.”
- By John Baez
[Picture: ‘The Blue Marble’ - most famous photograph of Earth taken December 7, 1972, by Apollo 17 spacecraft crew] 

WORTH THE READ:

"…The human race makes big decisions based on an economic model that ignores many negative externalities.

'negative externality' is, very roughly, a way in which my actions impose a cost on you, for which I don’t pay any price.

For example: suppose I live in a high-rise apartment and my toilet breaks. Instead of fixing it, I realize that I can just use a bucket — and throw its contents out the window! Whee! If society has no mechanism for dealing with people like me, I pay no price for doing this. But you, down there, will be very unhappy.

This isn’t just theoretical. Once upon a time in Europe there were few private toilets, and people would shout “gardyloo!” before throwing their waste down to the streets below. In retrospect that seems disgusting, but many of the big problems that afflict us now can be seen as the result of equally disgusting externalities. For example:

  • Carbon dioxide pollution caused by burning fossil fuels. If the expected costs of global warming and ocean acidification were included in the price of fossil fuels, other sources of energy would more quickly become competitive. This is the idea behind a carbon tax or a ‘cap-and-trade program’ where companies pay for permits to put carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.
  • Dead zones. Put too much nitrogen and phosophorus in the river, and lots of algae will grow in the ocean near the river’s mouth. When the algae dies and rots, the water runs out of dissolved oxygen, and fish cannot live there. Then we have a ‘dead zone’. Dead zones are expanding and increasing in number. For example, there’s one about 20,000 square kilometers in size near the mouth of the Mississippi River. Hog farming, chicken farming and runoff from fertilized crop lands are largely to blame.
  • Overfishing. Since there is no ownership of fish, everyone tries to catch as many fish as possible, even though this is depleting fish stocks to the point of near-extinction. There’s evidence that populations of all big predatory ocean fish have dropped 90% since 1950. Populations of cod, bluefish tuna and many other popular fish have plummeted, despite feeble attempts at regulation.
  • Species extinction due to habitat loss. Since the economic value of intact ecosystems has not been fully reckoned, in many parts of the world there’s little price to pay for destroying them.
  • Overpopulation. Rising population is a major cause of the stresses on our biosphere, yet it costs less to have your own child than to adopt one. (However, a pilot project in India is offering cash payments to couples who put off having children for two years after marriage.)

One could go on.

Externalities often arise when we treat some resource as essentially infinite — for example fish, or clean water, or clean air. We thus impose no cost for using it. This is fine at first. But because this resource is free, we use more and more — until it no longer makes sense to act as if we have an infinite amount. As a physicist would say, the approximation breaks down, and we enter a new regime.

This is happening all over the place now. We have reached the point where we need to treat most resources as finite and take this into account in our economic decisions. We can’t afford so many externalities. It is irrational to let them go on.

But what can you do about this? Or what can I do?

We can do the things anyone can do. Educate ourselves. Educate our friends. Vote. Conserve energy. Don’t throw buckets of crap out of apartment windows.”

- By John Baez

[Picture: ‘The Blue Marble’ - most famous photograph of Earth taken December 7, 1972, by Apollo 17 spacecraft crew] 

11.02.12 3
Zoom This is a real Panda! China has a “Panda Diplomacy” so this one is being sent to Japan as a friendship envoy. For safety reasons, he sits as a passenger with his feeder and not in a cage. Fastening his seat belt, wearing a diaper and eating bamboo. I wonder how much his ticket cost?

This is a real Panda! China has a “Panda Diplomacy” so this one is being sent to Japan as a friendship envoy. For safety reasons, he sits as a passenger with his feeder and not in a cage. Fastening his seat belt, wearing a diaper and eating bamboo. I wonder how much his ticket cost?

11.01.12 25
Zoom Orangutan survives after being shot 100 times
An endangered orangutan on Borneo island has survived after being shot more than 100 times with an air rifle.
The female ape, whom conservationists have named Aan, has gone blind in one eye and sustained serious wounds across her body after being repeatedly hit with pellets on the Indonesian part of the island…

Orangutan survives after being shot 100 times

An endangered orangutan on Borneo island has survived after being shot more than 100 times with an air rifle.

The female ape, whom conservationists have named Aan, has gone blind in one eye and sustained serious wounds across her body after being repeatedly hit with pellets on the Indonesian part of the island…

10.26.12 3
Zoom 'Margay cat' Via Animal Story

'Margay cat' Via Animal Story

08.27.12 29