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Posts tagged protection.

"Finning bans made simple"

- Anyone anywhere interested in shark conservation and shark finning issues should watch this. Short, succinct video in simple English.

11.22.12 11
Zoom rhamphotheca:

Success Story:  Blue Iguana Crawls Back From Extinction
by LiveScience staff
Just a decade ago, the Grand Cayman blue iguana was on the brink of extinction, with only 10 to 25 individuals left in the wild. But the reptile has made a major comeback and is no longer listed as a critically endangered species.
The blue iguana, which is only found on the Caribbean island Grand Cayman, now has a population of about 750 thanks to a recovery program. And over the weekend, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) updated its listing of the species from critically endangered to endangered.
An endangered status is probably the best conservationists could ever hope for as far as the reptile is concerned, said Fred Burton, director of the Blue Iguana Recovery Program.
“Human impacts on Grand Cayman are now so extensive that there just isn’t scope for these iguanas to regain numbers in the tens of thousands,” Burton explained in a statement. “However, we are confident that we will achieve our lon-term goal of restoring at least 1,000 Grand Cayman blue iguanas to the wild.”
The blue iguana is the largest native species on Grand Cayman. The reptiles often grow to more than 5 feet (1.5 meters) in length and weighs more than 25 pounds (11 kilograms). They once ranged over most of the island’s coastal areas and interior dry shrub lands before habitat destruction, car-related deaths and free-roaming dogs and cats pushed them toward extinction.
The recovery program involves habitat protection, research, monitoring and releasing captive-bred iguanas into the wild.
(via: Live Science)          (photo: male Cayman Blue Iguana, by Fred Burton)

I always love to hear good conservation news!

rhamphotheca:

Success Story:  Blue Iguana Crawls Back From Extinction

by LiveScience staff

Just a decade ago, the Grand Cayman blue iguana was on the brink of extinction, with only 10 to 25 individuals left in the wild. But the reptile has made a major comeback and is no longer listed as a critically endangered species.

The blue iguana, which is only found on the Caribbean island Grand Cayman, now has a population of about 750 thanks to a recovery program. And over the weekend, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) updated its listing of the species from critically endangered to endangered.

An endangered status is probably the best conservationists could ever hope for as far as the reptile is concerned, said Fred Burton, director of the Blue Iguana Recovery Program.

“Human impacts on Grand Cayman are now so extensive that there just isn’t scope for these iguanas to regain numbers in the tens of thousands,” Burton explained in a statement. “However, we are confident that we will achieve our lon-term goal of restoring at least 1,000 Grand Cayman blue iguanas to the wild.”

The blue iguana is the largest native species on Grand Cayman. The reptiles often grow to more than 5 feet (1.5 meters) in length and weighs more than 25 pounds (11 kilograms). They once ranged over most of the island’s coastal areas and interior dry shrub lands before habitat destruction, car-related deaths and free-roaming dogs and cats pushed them toward extinction.

The recovery program involves habitat protection, research, monitoring and releasing captive-bred iguanas into the wild.

(via: Live Science)          (photo: male Cayman Blue Iguana, by Fred Burton)

I always love to hear good conservation news!

10.26.12 883
Tigers and Company: Kawal Sanctuary notified as Tiger Reserve

tigersandcompany:

Much to the delight of animal-lovers and environmentalists, the state government on Tuesday notified the Kawal Wildlife Sanctuary in Adilabad district as Tiger Reserve. About 893 sqkm of the wildlife sanctuary has been notified as core area, where no development activity is allowed, and another…

04.11.12 12

stopsharkfinning:

The tide is turning against shark fin soup… watch this video for a review of progress over the last few years.

A short documentary about the Tide that is Turning against Shark Fin. The short film highlights how nations, cities and people around the globe are saying No

Everyone this is a great Shark Fin video, give it a watch. A don’t worry - it’s not doom and gloom… it’s hope and change! Say NO to shark fin soup!

03.02.12 11
Zoom Rhino Wars
Rivaling the price of gold on the black market, rhino horn is at the center of a bloody poaching battle…

Rhino Wars

Rivaling the price of gold on the black market, rhino horn is at the center of a bloody poaching battle…

02.26.12 893

koalaland:

As predicted by many people in the koala and bush conservation movement, the decision to save vital habitat by listing the koala as a protected species has been delayed. It’s a sad day for Australian politics when the interests of a few politicians anxious to secure seats in the upcoming QLD state elections have been put before an animal which has graced this earth for over 16 MILLION YEARS!!
 http://koalaland.com.au/ government-continues-to-delay-k oalas-protection-status
02.16.12 12
Zoom
01.28.12 77
Zoom Local children from a secluded village in Indonesian Borneo see for the first time a filming crew and video cameras. The crew have come to work with the village and film their plight against palm oil plantations - telling their story to the world. 

Local children from a secluded village in Indonesian Borneo see for the first time a filming crew and video cameras. The crew have come to work with the village and film their plight against palm oil plantations - telling their story to the world. 

01.13.12 4
Zoom Help support endangered Tiger Research! Text “BIGCATS” to 50555 to give $5 or $10 in support of National Geographic’s Big Cat Initiative. Easy!
 - If you give a $5.00 donation, a one-time donation in the amount of $5.00 will appear on your wireless bill or be deducted from your prepaid balance for each text message donation. 
In the event that you opt-in to an alert, advocacy or informational campaign with a TMF charity, you will receive additional text messages from your selected charity. You can unsubscribe or opt-out from receiving these messages in the future at any time by sending “STOP” to the relevant short code.
You can get help with any campaign at any time by texting “HELP” to the relevant short code.

Help support endangered Tiger Research! Text “BIGCATS” to 50555 to give $5 or $10 in support of National Geographic’s Big Cat Initiative. Easy!

 - If you give a $5.00 donation, a one-time donation in the amount of $5.00 will appear on your wireless bill or be deducted from your prepaid balance for each text message donation. 

In the event that you opt-in to an alert, advocacy or informational campaign with a TMF charity, you will receive additional text messages from your selected charity. You can unsubscribe or opt-out from receiving these messages in the future at any time by sending “STOP” to the relevant short code.

You can get help with any campaign at any time by texting “HELP” to the relevant short code.

11.07.11 547
Zoom The recent tragedy at a private farm in Ohio where 48 exotic animals were shot dead has sparked interest and anger around the world. After reading numerous comments and debates, I am prompted to share some information about Bengal Tigers - 18 of which were lost during that fateful day.

Although the Bengal tiger is the most numerous of all tiger subspecies, the total wild population number is estimated to be less than 2500. That is less than the total number of tiger pets in the USA alone.
They are being pushed out of their natural habitat by a growing and spreading human population. Increasing human-tiger conflicts often lead to retributive killings. Tigers additionally face a serious threat from the Chinese medicine industry - the main reason for the unrelenting poaching pressure. For example, in 2009 the Panna Tiger Reserve in India lost all of its tigers (24 in total) due to excessive poaching.
But what makes them so important? Firstly, they are apex predators (top predators) in their environment. They maintain the balance by keeping herbivore numbers regular. The crucial importance of predators in an ecosystem has been documented many times. A famous example are the wolves in Yellowstone National Park. 

Secondly, they are amazingly beautiful creatures. Economically speaking, they are great money makers when it comes to tourism. Although there are no official statistics, apparently around 500, 000 tourists visit tiger reserves every year in India alone. These dollars support local communities so a loss of tigers can mean a loss of local income. 

What I want is for people to understand what an incredible loss 18 Bengal Tigers is to the planet. The officers who shot the exotic animals, including the tigers, at the private farm were simply doing their job and I do not deny that they were working in some very terrifying and extreme circumstances.
In light of the situation, perhaps the animals deaths will not be in vain. Slack exotic animal ownership laws in the USA have been tolerated for far too long and perhaps this dark cloud will have silver lining. These laws need to change. Wild animals belong in the wild - not only are they needed there for the role they play in their ecosystem, they are a source of income to many local reserves AND they add to an increasingly dwindling gene pool. 
Your next step: Sign the petition to ban the sale, ownership and harboring of exotic animals in Ohio.

The recent tragedy at a private farm in Ohio where 48 exotic animals were shot dead has sparked interest and anger around the world. After reading numerous comments and debates, I am prompted to share some information about Bengal Tigers - 18 of which were lost during that fateful day.

Although the Bengal tiger is the most numerous of all tiger subspecies, the total wild population number is estimated to be less than 2500. That is less than the total number of tiger pets in the USA alone.

They are being pushed out of their natural habitat by a growing and spreading human population. Increasing human-tiger conflicts often lead to retributive killings. Tigers additionally face a serious threat from the Chinese medicine industry - the main reason for the unrelenting poaching pressure. For example, in 2009 the Panna Tiger Reserve in India lost all of its tigers (24 in total) due to excessive poaching.

But what makes them so important? Firstly, they are apex predators (top predators) in their environment. They maintain the balance by keeping herbivore numbers regular. The crucial importance of predators in an ecosystem has been documented many times. A famous example are the wolves in Yellowstone National Park

Secondly, they are amazingly beautiful creatures. Economically speaking, they are great money makers when it comes to tourism. Although there are no official statistics, apparently around 500, 000 tourists visit tiger reserves every year in India alone. These dollars support local communities so a loss of tigers can mean a loss of local income. 

What I want is for people to understand what an incredible loss 18 Bengal Tigers is to the planet. The officers who shot the exotic animals, including the tigers, at the private farm were simply doing their job and I do not deny that they were working in some very terrifying and extreme circumstances.

In light of the situation, perhaps the animals deaths will not be in vain. Slack exotic animal ownership laws in the USA have been tolerated for far too long and perhaps this dark cloud will have silver lining. These laws need to change. Wild animals belong in the wild - not only are they needed there for the role they play in their ecosystem, they are a source of income to many local reserves AND they add to an increasingly dwindling gene pool. 

Your next step: Sign the petition to ban the sale, ownership and harboring of exotic animals in Ohio.

10.24.11 391
The Life of an Ocean Activist: Tea Party Goes After The Manatees.

theinformedvegan:

Since it turned out that Barack Obama was born in the USA, the Tea Party is in need of a new villain. A villain whose very existence is helping turn America into communist Russia. Someone pure evil and anti-American like…the manatees!

Citrus County Florida Tea Party…

07.15.11 130
Zoom A green sea turtle recently washed up dead on a New South Wales beach in Australia - it was found to have over 300 pieces of plastic debris lodged in its guts. This is a new and depressing record.  "Unfortunately we counted 317 pieces of plastic from the lower intestine of the turtle and there is no question what caused the death of this animal," said Rochelle Ferris, General Manager of Australian Seabird Rescue.Plastics floating in the ocean can resemble small fish, squid and jellyfish and other marine creatures which are also sea turtle food. According to a recent study, around 36 percent of sea turtles are affected by marine debris, which is scary considering the various other human pressures they face on top of this. Trawling, hunting, long-line fishing, egg poaching… the list goes on. All species of marine turtle are in serious, serious trouble - except for one which has insufficient data. 
Image: The famous photograph of the contents of a dead sea turtles stomach. It included plastic, glass and many other forms of human rubbish.

A green sea turtle recently washed up dead on a New South Wales beach in Australia - it was found to have over 300 pieces of plastic debris lodged in its guts. This is a new and depressing record. 

"Unfortunately we counted 317 pieces of plastic from the lower intestine of the turtle and there is no question what caused the death of this animal," said Rochelle Ferris, General Manager of Australian Seabird Rescue.

Plastics floating in the ocean can resemble small fish, squid and jellyfish and other marine creatures which are also sea turtle food. According to a recent study, around 36 percent of sea turtles are affected by marine debris, which is scary considering the various other human pressures they face on top of this. Trawling, hunting, long-line fishing, egg poaching… the list goes on. All species of marine turtle are in serious, serious trouble - except for one which has insufficient data. 

Image: The famous photograph of the contents of a dead sea turtles stomach. It included plastic, glass and many other forms of human rubbish.

07.10.11 10
Conservation dollars and sense: A case for shark conservation through ecotourism

piratesheart:

A live shark is worth more than a dead shark! My work later in life, perhaps?

06.30.11 3
Zoom I’m disappointed too!
Six out of the seven species of sea turtles are listed as Endangered or Critically Endangered. 

Only 1 in 1000 turtles ever make it to adulthood - and this doesn’t even include human impacts. Really, this number would be much less. 
Although marine turtles are faced with many natural threats, humans are dramatically reducing population sizes at all ends of the spectrum. Through the destruction of nesting beaches, egg collection for traditional delicacies, and unsustainable fishing methods (like trawling and long-line), turtles are disappearing faster than they are reproducing. 
Get back into Mr. Turtle’s good books - know where your seafood comes from. Check out if it is sustainable or not here. 

I’m disappointed too!

Six out of the seven species of sea turtles are listed as Endangered or Critically Endangered. 

Only 1 in 1000 turtles ever make it to adulthood - and this doesn’t even include human impacts. Really, this number would be much less. 

Although marine turtles are faced with many natural threats, humans are dramatically reducing population sizes at all ends of the spectrum. Through the destruction of nesting beaches, egg collection for traditional delicacies, and unsustainable fishing methods (like trawling and long-line), turtles are disappearing faster than they are reproducing. 

Get back into Mr. Turtle’s good books - know where your seafood comes from. Check out if it is sustainable or not here

06.04.11 90
Zoom  
A marine biologist rant
 
Right. So last year, The United States pushed to ban the international trade of Atlantic bluefin tuna. Not surprisingly though, the proposal was defeated at the UN Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species after intense lobbying against the plan by Japan and some European nations. I wonder if a single adult bluefin tuna selling for upwards of US$50,000 has anything to do with it? 
 

Anyway, the US on Friday now rejected calls to protect Atlantic bluefin tuna as an endangered species, saying that while it was worried about overfishing it did not fear “imminent extinction”. Huh. It did not fear imminent extinction.
There is countless research and warnings from scientists and environmental groups. I don’t get it. Do governments think scientists have a vendetta against seafood and will find any excuse to class marine life as ‘endangered’?
The WWF has estimated that Atlantic Bluefin Tuna will go extinct by 2012 - that’s next year - if overfishing of the species continues. Where was that pulled from? Obviously it must be WWF making up OTT statistics again - I’m sure the panda is fine too. 
The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said they would put Atlantic bluefin tuna on a watchlist of species at risk, but would not classify it under the Endangered Species Act, which would bring legal protections. Because God forbid - legal protections!
Eric Schwaab, a senior official at this agency said: “Based on careful scientific review, we have decided the best way to ensure the long-term sustainability of bluefin tuna is through international cooperation and strong domestic fishery management”.
What I get from that is they really need international cooperation if bluefin tuna is ever going to be protected. Well, I agree - the Japanese demand for sushi and sashimi alone drives 40% of the market. But Mr. Schwaab, whats that about “strong domestic fishery management”? I agree with that too, but if you aren’t going to legally list the animal as endangered how do you propose to manage it without the power to?
This is what is going to happen now. Our buddy Mr. Schwaab and his administration pledge to review their decision in early 2013. And rightly so, as they didn’t take into full account the effects of last year’s massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico - a bluefin tuna breeding ground. However, this date is a year after estimated extinction.
I don’t know which I find more concerning - the fact that another creature on our planet is hanging by a thread, or that short-term profits and fancy-pants sushi has more value in todays society than the mere existence of species.

A marine biologist rant

Right. So last year, The United States pushed to ban the international trade of Atlantic bluefin tuna. Not surprisingly though, the proposal was defeated at the UN Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species after intense lobbying against the plan by Japan and some European nations. I wonder if a single adult bluefin tuna selling for upwards of US$50,000 has anything to do with it?

 

Anyway, the US on Friday now rejected calls to protect Atlantic bluefin tuna as an endangered species, saying that while it was worried about overfishing it did not fear “imminent extinction”. Huh. It did not fear imminent extinction.

There is countless research and warnings from scientists and environmental groups. I don’t get it. Do governments think scientists have a vendetta against seafood and will find any excuse to class marine life as ‘endangered’?

The WWF has estimated that Atlantic Bluefin Tuna will go extinct by 2012 - that’s next year - if overfishing of the species continues. Where was that pulled from? Obviously it must be WWF making up OTT statistics again - I’m sure the panda is fine too. 

The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said they would put Atlantic bluefin tuna on a watchlist of species at risk, but would not classify it under the Endangered Species Act, which would bring legal protections. Because God forbid - legal protections!

Eric Schwaab, a senior official at this agency said: “Based on careful scientific review, we have decided the best way to ensure the long-term sustainability of bluefin tuna is through international cooperation and strong domestic fishery management”.

What I get from that is they really need international cooperation if bluefin tuna is ever going to be protected. Well, I agree - the Japanese demand for sushi and sashimi alone drives 40% of the market. But Mr. Schwaab, whats that about “strong domestic fishery management”? I agree with that too, but if you aren’t going to legally list the animal as endangered how do you propose to manage it without the power to?

This is what is going to happen now. Our buddy Mr. Schwaab and his administration pledge to review their decision in early 2013. And rightly so, as they didn’t take into full account the effects of last year’s massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico - a bluefin tuna breeding ground. However, this date is a year after estimated extinction.

I don’t know which I find more concerning - the fact that another creature on our planet is hanging by a thread, or that short-term profits and fancy-pants sushi has more value in todays society than the mere existence of species.

05.28.11 59