Back to top.
Posts tagged rainforest.
Zoom Orangutan Survival Odyssey: Trek through the jungles of Borneo, go behind the scenes of orangutan rescue and rehabilitation and see parts of a country and culture not in the travel guides. 
- Run by Orangutan Odysseys

Orangutan Survival Odyssey: Trek through the jungles of Borneo, go behind the scenes of orangutan rescue and rehabilitation and see parts of a country and culture not in the travel guides. 

- Run by Orangutan Odysseys

11.26.12 4
Zoom untilallarefreenooneisfree:

Diversity of species in the rainforest.
Larger image.

untilallarefreenooneisfree:

Diversity of species in the rainforest.

Larger image.

11.07.12 278
Zoom Ecofieldtrips Field Biologist Recruitment for 2013!!Do you love nature, hiking and snorkelling? Are you adventurous and outgoing? Are you just bursting to show the wonders of nature to the people around you? If you are, Ecofieldtrips wants you!
If you are a graduate in Biology, Zoology, Oceanography, Geography or a related field and would like an amazing opportunity to launch your career, this is the job for you.Being an Ecofieldtrips Field Biologist is about being a leader and inspiring the next generation. As a role model for young people you will be passing on important life values and broadening young minds and opening their eyes to environmental issues around us.Applicants must be outgoing, with a good work ethics and leadership skills. A strong interest in tropical ecosystems and environmental conservation matters is needed. Certification required: 1st Aid, Scuba Diving OR Life Saving.Training will commence in early January and July. New biologists can expect to start working on fieldtrips after training is completed.For more information, visit us at www.ecofieldtrips.com

If you have what it takes, email our Company Director at bridget@ecofieldtrips.com with a copy of your CV and a cover letter.

Ecofieldtrips Field Biologist Recruitment for 2013!!

Do you love nature, hiking and snorkelling? Are you adventurous and outgoing? Are you just bursting to show the wonders of nature to the people around you? 

If you are, Ecofieldtrips wants you!


If you are a graduate in Biology, Zoology, Oceanography, Geography or a related field and would like an amazing opportunity to launch your career, this is the job for you.

Being an Ecofieldtrips Field Biologist is about being a leader and inspiring the next generation. As a role model for young people you will be passing on important life values and broadening young minds and opening their eyes to environmental issues around us.

Applicants must be outgoing, with a good work ethics and leadership skills. A strong interest in tropical ecosystems and environmental conservation matters is needed. Certification required: 1st Aid, Scuba Diving OR Life Saving.

Training will commence in early January and July. New biologists can expect to start working on fieldtrips after training is completed.

For more information, visit us at www.ecofieldtrips.com

If you have what it takes, email our Company Director at bridget@ecofieldtrips.com with a copy of your CV and a cover letter.
10.05.12 10
Zoom Sumatran Orangutan: “It is no longer several years away, but just a few months or even weeks before this iconic creature disappears”Hundreds of orangutans are believed to have died in fires deliberately lit by palm oil companies in the last few weeks. Conservationists say the rare Sumatran orangutan could now be wiped out within weeks.
Read more here.

Sumatran Orangutan: “It is no longer several years away, but just a few months or even weeks before this iconic creature disappears”
Hundreds of orangutans are believed to have died in fires deliberately lit by palm oil companies in the last few weeks. Conservationists say the rare Sumatran orangutan could now be wiped out within weeks.

Read more here.

04.11.12 867

tiffcheongsy:

Saving our rainforests - A game of Jenga?

We used to use the Jenga analogy to teach school kids about protecting the planet on our field trips!

03.26.12 12
Zoom Oops, 5000 acres of your land cleared for palm oil. Sorry.
A subsidiary of agribusiness giant Cargill has paid a $1 million fine for clearing land for oil palm outside its concession, a move that could serve as an important example for palm oil developers operating in Indonesia, according to Greenomics-Indonesia, a Jakarta-based environmental group.The fine was levied on Cargill subsidiary PT Hindoli after the company notified local authorities and the Ministry of Forestry that it had accidentally cleared about 2,000 hectares of land beyond the boundary of its formally licensed area in South Sumatra Province. The clearing, which took place in 2005, involved agricultural land that was still zoned as “forest” by the Ministry of Forestry even though it lacked exploitable timber.Read more:http://news.mongabay.com/2012/0223-hindoli_fine_palm_oil.html#ixzz1nZ1Fkkx4

Oops, 5000 acres of your land cleared for palm oil. Sorry.

A subsidiary of agribusiness giant Cargill has paid a $1 million fine for clearing land for oil palm outside its concession, a move that could serve as an important example for palm oil developers operating in Indonesia, according to Greenomics-Indonesia, a Jakarta-based environmental group.

The fine was levied on Cargill subsidiary PT Hindoli after the company notified local authorities and the Ministry of Forestry that it had accidentally cleared about 2,000 hectares of land beyond the boundary of its formally licensed area in South Sumatra Province. The clearing, which took place in 2005, involved agricultural land that was still zoned as “forest” by the Ministry of Forestry even though it lacked exploitable timber.

Read more:http://news.mongabay.com/2012/0223-hindoli_fine_palm_oil.html#ixzz1nZ1Fkkx4

02.27.12 6
Zoom The Mysterious Backside
Calling all wildlifarians! I snapped a photograph of this buttocks in 2010 when I was exploring the surrounding limestone casts of Ipoh, Malaysia. No one has been 100% certain about the owner of this behind so I turn to you! Macaque, binturong, civet cat, langur? Who Am I? 

The Mysterious Backside

Calling all wildlifarians! I snapped a photograph of this buttocks in 2010 when I was exploring the surrounding limestone casts of Ipoh, Malaysia. No one has been 100% certain about the owner of this behind so I turn to you! Macaque, binturong, civet cat, langur? Who Am I? 

01.11.12 276
Oil Palm vs. a Sweet alternative.

What if we could find a way to make the forests more valuable than chopping them down for timber and palm oil?

What if there was a  way that protecting the forests became the most financially beneficial option for local people – so much so that they would no longer be open to bribes and corruption from the palm oil companies?

It seems Dr. Willie Smits may have found a solution to this problem, which could literally change the deforestation game forever…

One of the reasons deforestation is so prolific in Indonesia, is because palm oil companies have faced very little resistance from local people in taking their land.  Much of this is because the palm oil companies cheat, lie, deceive and even steal land from the traditional landowners. But it’s also because in the short term, the pittance they are paid for their families’ land is too tempting for some people to turn down.

So, for a few thousand dollars - and a fist full of soon to be broken promises - the lands these local people have held for centuries are signed over to palm oil companies to destroy.

In the short term, such deals can allow the local people to buy fuel for their bikes (there is a massive shortage of fuel in Kalimantan), mobile phones or credit, or other simple luxuries. In the long term, it is the end of their communities, their livelihoods, and their futures.

If we as a planet are to reduce deforestation, we need to find an alternative for the local people. A way to ensure the value of keeping the forest in tact outweighs any short term financial tricks the palm oil companies can offer.

Sugar Palm is a very exciting option that may be our best chance ever.

To be clear –  Sugar Palm is the exact opposite of the highly destructive Oil Palm. These trees do not grow in a monoculture – they require the diverse forest to thrive.  Because they require the entire forest to be sustained, this sustains all kinds of life, keeping the natural balance of the forest in tact.  In palm oil plantations, on the other hand, only the palm oil trees grow.  The natural diversity is destroyed – the animals that aren’t butchered and killed are left to starve in a barren biological desert.

Sugar palms releases large quantities of juice (up to 50 litres per day).  This juice can be efficiently converted into bio-ethanol, palm sugar (low GI), animal feed, electricity, medicines,  bio-plastics, and at least 50 additional products created to date using scientific methods developed by Dr.Willie Smits.

According to Willie, the amount of energy produced by a sugar palm beats that of all other crops (e.g. it provides over three times more energy than sugar cane).  In fact, as far as solar power goes, the sugar palm is a highly effective photovoltaic converter.

Local people have been collecting the sugar and using it for medicine, cooking, fire barriers, fiber (rope) construction for years.   So what’s new?

The first ever 'factory in a box village hub'

The first ever Village Hub - ‘factory in a box’ model by Dr. Willie Smits

In this photo, you can see two factories known as “Village Hubs”.   The larger one in the background is the original, the much smaller one in the front is a revolutionary new semi-portable factory.  Both factories include technology to  allow local people to convert their sugar palm into energy, giving them credits that can be used for electricity, clean drinking water, internet access, education service, animal feed, biofuel and more.  It is literally a currency exchange centre, allowing sugar to be converted into products and services on the spot.

This is fantastic news for orangutans, gibbons, sun-bears and all the other animals that live in the forest. If this takes off quickly, and the demand from the local people drives the establishment of more of these hubs, it is one of the best chances we have to save the forests and the species that live in them.  

As always, this is about education and free choice.  If this works as well on scale as the first production model (this is beyond prototype), and the local people choose this above the alternative (no comparison),  this is going to make a significant, positive difference to the planet forever.

 -  Article by Sean Tierney from collaborateforachange.com

12.22.11 16
Zoom Conservationist Dr Willie Smits, pictured here with one of his rescued orangutans, leads a team of 15 ‘Eco-Warriors' for a 100 day deforestACTION project in the forests of Borneo. Willie Smits is infamous in conservation circles for founding the Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation and reforesting 2000 hectares of degraded land in Borneo. An area which has now seen an increase in cloud cover and 30% more rainfall. To see how he did it, watch his inspirational TED talk here. (Yes I know I’ve posted the link before but it truly is incredible.)

Conservationist Dr Willie Smits, pictured here with one of his rescued orangutans, leads a team of 15 ‘Eco-Warriors' for a 100 day deforestACTION project in the forests of Borneo. Willie Smits is infamous in conservation circles for founding the Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation and reforesting 2000 hectares of degraded land in Borneo. An area which has now seen an increase in cloud cover and 30% more rainfall. To see how he did it, watch his inspirational TED talk here. (Yes I know I’ve posted the link before but it truly is incredible.)

12.22.11 72
Zoom COMING SOON
Project Borneo 3D: The Rise of the Eco-Warrior
12.22.11 45

Rainforests to Reefs with Ecofieldtrips

A snapshot of the outdoor programs Ecofieldtrips run in Southeast Asia.

Edited by yours truly. 

11.18.11 5
Zoom The Müller’s Bornean gibbon (Hylobates muelleri), also known as the grey gibbon is an ape (not a monkey!) endemic to the island of Borneo. Gibbons are the masters of tree top locomotion. They are able to swing from branch to branch thanks to their ball-and-socket-jointed wrists which allow biaxial movement. 
It will come as no surprise to many that they are listed as Endangered on the IUCN list. For the past 60 years, the island of Borneo has suffered extensive deforestation and many animals, not just gibbons, are losing out to an immense loss of habitat.
There are many projects out there trying to protect or reforest Borneo. If you’re thinking about helping out - whether it be through donations, education or volunteering - I recommend taking a look here.
creepicrawlies:

Acrobatics: The Gibbon balancing on the Liana vine in the Tanjung Puting National Park in Borneo, IndonesiaRead more

The Müller’s Bornean gibbon (Hylobates muelleri), also known as the grey gibbon is an ape (not a monkey!) endemic to the island of BorneoGibbons are the masters of tree top locomotion. They are able to swing from branch to branch thanks to their ball-and-socket-jointed wrists which allow biaxial movement. 

It will come as no surprise to many that they are listed as Endangered on the IUCN list. For the past 60 years, the island of Borneo has suffered extensive deforestation and many animals, not just gibbons, are losing out to an immense loss of habitat.

There are many projects out there trying to protect or reforest Borneo. If you’re thinking about helping out - whether it be through donations, education or volunteering - I recommend taking a look here.

creepicrawlies:

Acrobatics: The Gibbon balancing on the Liana vine in the Tanjung Puting National Park in Borneo, Indonesia

Read more

10.27.11 92

Coming soon in 2012, Project Borneo 3D is the first of its kind. A large-scale, mainstream movie to be released in cinemas around the world about saving rainforests and orangutans in Borneo. The movie follows 15 young people, like you and I, on their journey to make a difference in a palm oil affected country. Awareness and education of deforestation at this magnitude will change attitudes and do things for forest conservation that we never thought possible. Follow Project Borneo - watch and share.

10.21.11 10