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Posts tagged science.
Zoom WIRES volunteer Kristen from the Southern Tablelands, Australia, took out first prize for her WIRES entry in the Goulburn 150th Birthday Giant Cupcake Competition!

WIRES volunteer Kristen from the Southern Tablelands, Australia, took out first prize for her WIRES entry in the Goulburn 150th Birthday Giant Cupcake Competition!

06.14.13 1
Zoom Sea creature pancakes… brilliant. 

Sea creature pancakes… brilliant. 

06.14.13 73
Zoom 'Marlin' with many young 'Nemo's'

'Marlin' with many young 'Nemo's'

05.06.13 6
Zoom BBC Natural History Unit Work Experience 
When: July 2013 - 4 weeks
Where: Bristol
For more details and to apply, click here. 

BBC Natural History Unit Work Experience 

When: July 2013 - 4 weeks

Where: Bristol

For more details and to apply, click here

05.03.13 1
Zoom Shamengo pioneer Pierre Calleja has invented something truly remarkable—a light powered by algae that absorbs CO2 in the air—at the rate of 1 ton PER YEAR, or what a tree absorbs over its entire lifetime! The microalgae streetlamp has the potential to provide significantly cleaner air in urban areas and revolutionize the cityscape…
Read more here!

Shamengo pioneer Pierre Calleja has invented something truly remarkable—a light powered by algae that absorbs CO2 in the air—at the rate of 1 ton PER YEAR, or what a tree absorbs over its entire lifetime! The microalgae streetlamp has the potential to provide significantly cleaner air in urban areas and revolutionize the cityscape…

Read more here!

12.09.12 4
Zoom Who is Tim Flannery?
The name has been popping up in my lectures and in the news recently and I’m ashamed to say I wasn’t quite sure who he was. After some research, I discovered this man is at the forefront of environmental education, research and government lobbying - I’m telling you, keep a close eye on this one.
I thought my resumé was impressive but his blows mine out of the water. 
Tim Flannery is a 56-year-old Australian raised in Melbourne. He has a masters degree in Earth Sciences and completed a palaeontology doctorate in Kangaroo evolution! Here he discovered and named more than thirty new species of mammals (including two tree-kangaroos) and played a role in the ground-breaking discovery of Cretaceous mammal fossils in Australia which extended the Australian mammal fossil record back 80 million years. Sir David Attenborough has described him as being in the league of the all-time great explorers saying that he has “discovered more new species than Charles Darwin.”. And this is just getting started. 
In 2005 he was named Australian Humanist of the Year, in 2006 the NSW Australian of the Year, and in 2007 honoured as Australian of the Year.
He is big on climate change education and mitigation. In 2007 Tim Flannery co-founded and was appointed Chair of The Copenhagen Climate Council. Last year, Flannery was appointed Chief Commissioner of the Australian Climate Change Commission.  He has also written several influential books that address our influence on climate, sustainability and the future.
And for any report-writing students out there? Flannery has been published in over 90 scientific papers.
I think at this stage Tim Flannery has, for me, progressed from ‘some-guy-they-quote-in-class’ to ‘I-want-to-be-him-when-I-grow-up’. Anyway I hope you enjoyed the mini bio and are as inspired as I am. For more info, here is his website. 
Your welcome.

Who is Tim Flannery?

The name has been popping up in my lectures and in the news recently and I’m ashamed to say I wasn’t quite sure who he was. After some research, I discovered this man is at the forefront of environmental education, research and government lobbying - I’m telling you, keep a close eye on this one.

I thought my resumé was impressive but his blows mine out of the water. 

Tim Flannery is a 56-year-old Australian raised in Melbourne. He has a masters degree in Earth Sciences and completed a palaeontology doctorate in Kangaroo evolution! Here he discovered and named more than thirty new species of mammals (including two tree-kangaroos) and played a role in the ground-breaking discovery of Cretaceous mammal fossils in Australia which extended the Australian mammal fossil record back 80 million years. Sir David Attenborough has described him as being in the league of the all-time great explorers saying that he has “discovered more new species than Charles Darwin.”And this is just getting started. 

In 2005 he was named Australian Humanist of the Year, in 2006 the NSW Australian of the Year, and in 2007 honoured as Australian of the Year.

He is big on climate change education and mitigation. In 2007 Tim Flannery co-founded and was appointed Chair of The Copenhagen Climate Council. Last year, Flannery was appointed Chief Commissioner of the Australian Climate Change Commission.  He has also written several influential books that address our influence on climate, sustainability and the future.

And for any report-writing students out there? Flannery has been published in over 90 scientific papers.

I think at this stage Tim Flannery has, for me, progressed from ‘some-guy-they-quote-in-class’ to ‘I-want-to-be-him-when-I-grow-up’. Anyway I hope you enjoyed the mini bio and are as inspired as I am. For more info, here is his website

Your welcome.

11.26.12 8
Zoom Hmm… So true
Via I fucking Love Science

Hmm… So true

Via I fucking Love Science

11.10.12 10
Food For Thought...
"The percentage of energy which is transferred from one trophic level to the next is variable, but is typically between 5 and 20% depending upon the species and ecosystem. In other words, 80 to 95% of the energy is lost at each level. What implications does this have for the human population and food consumption? By consuming meat and animal products, 80 to 95% of the energy produced by plants is lost by this trophic transfer. The earth could sustain a higher population if humans consumed only plant‐products rather than animals."
- 'Productivity & Energy' Lecture Notes
10.28.12 1
Zoom BY AMY SINATRA AYRES
The hatching of this member of the cuckoo species makes the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Central Park Zoo only the fourth zoo in the U.S. to successfully rear a crested coua chick.
Native to the island of Madagascar, the animals are born with markings on the inside of their mouths that are unique to each individual chick. Experts believe the markings are used by the bird’s parents for identification, or as a target for feeding them. They will begin to fade as the chick matures.
There are only about 40 crested couas living in American zoos.

BY AMY SINATRA AYRES

The hatching of this member of the cuckoo species makes the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Central Park Zoo only the fourth zoo in the U.S. to successfully rear a crested coua chick.

Native to the island of Madagascar, the animals are born with markings on the inside of their mouths that are unique to each individual chick. Experts believe the markings are used by the bird’s parents for identification, or as a target for feeding them. They will begin to fade as the chick matures.

There are only about 40 crested couas living in American zoos.

10.25.12 5

Monkey hilariously reacts to receiving unequal pay…

[2:39 mins]

10.12.12 7
Zoom Ecofieldtrips Field Biologist Recruitment for 2013!!Do you love nature, hiking and snorkelling? Are you adventurous and outgoing? Are you just bursting to show the wonders of nature to the people around you? If you are, Ecofieldtrips wants you!
If you are a graduate in Biology, Zoology, Oceanography, Geography or a related field and would like an amazing opportunity to launch your career, this is the job for you.Being an Ecofieldtrips Field Biologist is about being a leader and inspiring the next generation. As a role model for young people you will be passing on important life values and broadening young minds and opening their eyes to environmental issues around us.Applicants must be outgoing, with a good work ethics and leadership skills. A strong interest in tropical ecosystems and environmental conservation matters is needed. Certification required: 1st Aid, Scuba Diving OR Life Saving.Training will commence in early January and July. New biologists can expect to start working on fieldtrips after training is completed.For more information, visit us at www.ecofieldtrips.com

If you have what it takes, email our Company Director at bridget@ecofieldtrips.com with a copy of your CV and a cover letter.

Ecofieldtrips Field Biologist Recruitment for 2013!!

Do you love nature, hiking and snorkelling? Are you adventurous and outgoing? Are you just bursting to show the wonders of nature to the people around you? 

If you are, Ecofieldtrips wants you!


If you are a graduate in Biology, Zoology, Oceanography, Geography or a related field and would like an amazing opportunity to launch your career, this is the job for you.

Being an Ecofieldtrips Field Biologist is about being a leader and inspiring the next generation. As a role model for young people you will be passing on important life values and broadening young minds and opening their eyes to environmental issues around us.

Applicants must be outgoing, with a good work ethics and leadership skills. A strong interest in tropical ecosystems and environmental conservation matters is needed. Certification required: 1st Aid, Scuba Diving OR Life Saving.

Training will commence in early January and July. New biologists can expect to start working on fieldtrips after training is completed.

For more information, visit us at www.ecofieldtrips.com

If you have what it takes, email our Company Director at bridget@ecofieldtrips.com with a copy of your CV and a cover letter.
10.05.12 10
Zoom “A dock weighing more than 180 tons has washed ashore in Oregon after being dislodged by 2011′s Japanese tsunami, carrying dozens of organisms that pose an invasive species threat. However, the dock also serves as an unprecedented natural experiment in open-ocean dispersal.”
Via I Fucking Love Science

A dock weighing more than 180 tons has washed ashore in Oregon after being dislodged by 2011′s Japanese tsunami, carrying dozens of organisms that pose an invasive species threat. However, the dock also serves as an unprecedented natural experiment in open-ocean dispersal.”

Via I Fucking Love Science

10.03.12 2
Zoom Spend 3 Months Studying Bottlenose Dolphins Off New Zealand
Volunteers required for a Bottlenose Dolphin Study [from 1st December 2012; Northland, New Zealand]
As of December 2012, a new PhD study will assess the behavioural ecology and conservation of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in the Bay of Islands, Northland, New Zealand. The field season will run year round and the first vacancy for volunteers is from December 1 2012. A minimum commitment of 3 months is preferred, with priority given to those who can commit to longer. 
Interested? Click here for more info. 

Spend 3 Months Studying Bottlenose Dolphins Off New Zealand

Volunteers required for a Bottlenose Dolphin Study [from 1st December 2012; Northland, New Zealand]

As of December 2012, a new PhD study will assess the behavioural ecology and conservation of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in the Bay of Islands, Northland, New Zealand. The field season will run year round and the first vacancy for volunteers is from December 1 2012. A minimum commitment of 3 months is preferred, with priority given to those who can commit to longer. 

Interested? Click here for more info. 

10.01.12 2
Zoom the-camera-trap:

Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) on Flickr.
Up close, these are probably the most beautiful bird I’ve ever seen

the-camera-trap:

Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) on Flickr.

Up close, these are probably the most beautiful bird I’ve ever seen

06.22.12 19
Zoom Turtles may hold the key to anti-aging
Researchers believe Australia’s freshwater turtles, one of the most threatened groups of animals on the planet, could provide an insight into the biological process of growing old.
Freshwater turtle expert Dr Ricky Spencer of the University of Western Sydney says the oldest turtles produce the most eggs.
"There’s no sign of menopause so they’re defying the common-held view that cell death is inevitable," Dr Spencer said.
"These guys are either delaying that, or they don’t expire like any other vertebrate."

Turtles may hold the key to anti-aging

Researchers believe Australia’s freshwater turtles, one of the most threatened groups of animals on the planet, could provide an insight into the biological process of growing old.

Freshwater turtle expert Dr Ricky Spencer of the University of Western Sydney says the oldest turtles produce the most eggs.

"There’s no sign of menopause so they’re defying the common-held view that cell death is inevitable," Dr Spencer said.

"These guys are either delaying that, or they don’t expire like any other vertebrate."

06.02.12 12