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Zoom “Conservation Sew Mates” - Proceeds go to support whale shark research projects in the Philippines! If you want one, please order on Flowing River’s FB page.

“Conservation Sew Mates” - Proceeds go to support whale shark research projects in the Philippines! If you want one, please order on Flowing River’s FB page.

06.02.13 30
Zoom “Conservation Sew Mates” - Proceeds go to support whale shark research projects in the Philippines! If you want one, please order on Flowing River’s FB page.

“Conservation Sew Mates” - Proceeds go to support whale shark research projects in the Philippines! If you want one, please order on Flowing River’s FB page.

06.02.13 8
Zoom rhamphotheca:

What is the Biggest Shark? A Chart Shows the Diversity of Shark Sizes
Sharks come in all sizes. The largest is the whale shark, which has been known to get as large as 18 meters (60 feet). The smallest fits in your hand. Find out how these modern sharks stack up against the ancient Carcharodon megalodon. And if you’re a fan of great white sharks, you can download a shark-themed board game, track a shark named Omoo, and listen to a podcast about the species on our Great White Shark section.
(via: Smithsonian Ocean Portal)
(image: © Courtesy of the Aquarium of the Pacific, Long Beach, California)

Nice diagram!

rhamphotheca:

What is the Biggest Shark? A Chart Shows the Diversity of Shark Sizes

Sharks come in all sizes. The largest is the whale shark, which has been known to get as large as 18 meters (60 feet). The smallest fits in your hand. Find out how these modern sharks stack up against the ancient Carcharodon megalodon. And if you’re a fan of great white sharks, you can download a shark-themed board game, track a shark named Omoo, and listen to a podcast about the species on our Great White Shark section.

(via: Smithsonian Ocean Portal)

(image: © Courtesy of the Aquarium of the Pacific, Long Beach, California)

Nice diagram!

11.24.12 1620

"Finning bans made simple"

- Anyone anywhere interested in shark conservation and shark finning issues should watch this. Short, succinct video in simple English.

11.22.12 11
Zoom Another critically endangered grey nurse shark has washed up on an eastern Australian beach, with its fins removed. The first shark washed up in early August and was a rare young breeding female with both dorsal fins removed - a huge blow. 
"The shark was still alive when it was found on the beach and suffered a slow, cruel death." said MP Cate Faehrmann. 
An investigation is under way but the fact of the matter is that current rules and regulations are simply not enough… 

Another critically endangered grey nurse shark has washed up on an eastern Australian beach, with its fins removed. The first shark washed up in early August and was a rare young breeding female with both dorsal fins removed - a huge blow. 

"The shark was still alive when it was found on the beach and suffered a slow, cruel death." said MP Cate Faehrmann. 

An investigation is under way but the fact of the matter is that current rules and regulations are simply not enough… 

08.14.12 361
Zoom
03.29.12 29

expose-the-light:

X-Rays of Fish Reveal Diversity

1. X-Ray Image of a Winghead Shark:

The distinctive form of a winghead shark, Eusphyra blochii, is revealed in an X-ray image. The shark’s eyes are spread far apart, giving it superb binocular vision.

2. X-Ray Image of a Long-Spined Porcupine Fish:

The robust oval, spine covered body of a long-spined porcupine fish, Diodon holocanthus, is revealed in this X-ray image.

3. X-Ray Image of a Monterey Skate:

An X-ray image of a Monterey skate, Raja montereyensis, reveals a spine that extends like a tail out from the pelvic fin. The skeletons of skates, rays, chimaeras, and sharks are made of cartilage, rather than bone.

CREDIT: © Sandra Raredon / Smithsonian Institution

4. X-Ray Image of a Longnose Butterflyfish:

An X-ray image of a longnose butterflyfish, Forcipiger longirostris, helps scientists study the fish’s complex bone structure.

CREDIT: Sandra J. Raredon / Smithsonian Institution
03.16.12 682

stopsharkfinning:

The tide is turning against shark fin soup… watch this video for a review of progress over the last few years.

A short documentary about the Tide that is Turning against Shark Fin. The short film highlights how nations, cities and people around the globe are saying No

Everyone this is a great Shark Fin video, give it a watch. A don’t worry - it’s not doom and gloom… it’s hope and change! Say NO to shark fin soup!

03.02.12 11
Zoom Fancy going for that long walk on the beach.. and finding this!
I can’t seem to find the story behind this poor Mako’s fate, so by all means if you know something I’m all ears!

Fancy going for that long walk on the beach.. and finding this!

I can’t seem to find the story behind this poor Mako’s fate, so by all means if you know something I’m all ears!

02.29.12 6
Zoom Hmm. Intriguing. 

Hmm. Intriguing. 

01.19.12 133
Zoom Mini-Shark Rescue
It has been over a month now since i’ve been able to work out in the field and i’ve found myself getting withdrawal symptoms. But come Sunday, my partner and i needed to get out of the house so we went for a walk along a little spit near my home. At the tip we spotted in the strandline a small, grey bamboo type shark and I thought ‘wow what a find - pity its dead’… Until its gills moved.  It was slowly dying and had obviously been tormented by sea birds as its caudal fin was slightly bleeding with small nibble marks. I had to get it back in the water.  So being very careful, for both our sakes, i moved it into the shallows and guided it around to get the water running over its gills. Bubbles escaped them. It was really weak and at first just lay on the bottom. But we monitored it for a while and noticed as time went by it gained strength. We approached it one last time and it swam a little deeper away from us. Good! Im glad to have given the little guy a fighting chance. How did he wash up in the first place? I don’t know… But after a month of working in an office, this little bamboo shark has reignited my passion for saving animals hands on… I gotta get back out there!!

Mini-Shark Rescue

It has been over a month now since i’ve been able to work out in the field and i’ve found myself getting withdrawal symptoms. But come Sunday, my partner and i needed to get out of the house so we went for a walk along a little spit near my home. At the tip we spotted in the strandline a small, grey bamboo type shark and I thought ‘wow what a find - pity its dead’… Until its gills moved. It was slowly dying and had obviously been tormented by sea birds as its caudal fin was slightly bleeding with small nibble marks. I had to get it back in the water. So being very careful, for both our sakes, i moved it into the shallows and guided it around to get the water running over its gills. Bubbles escaped them. It was really weak and at first just lay on the bottom. But we monitored it for a while and noticed as time went by it gained strength. We approached it one last time and it swam a little deeper away from us. Good! Im glad to have given the little guy a fighting chance. How did he wash up in the first place? I don’t know… But after a month of working in an office, this little bamboo shark has reignited my passion for saving animals hands on… I gotta get back out there!!

01.15.12 148
Pro Shark-Finners Lose Another (Big) Battle
01.05.12 4
Zoom Hooked Shark by Terry Goss
Grand prize winner of the Marine Photobank’s 2011 Ocean in Focus Conservation Photo Contest.

Hooked Shark by Terry Goss

Grand prize winner of the Marine Photobank’s 2011 Ocean in Focus Conservation Photo Contest.

11.28.11 50
Zoom Think you’ve seen it all? What about a one-eyed albino shark fetus… 
10.15.11 8